Search This Blog

Announcement on four day training programme on Basic and Advanced Data Analysis using SPSS

In the SPSS series, Sambodhi is announcing a four day training programme on Basic and Advanced Data Analysis using SPSS from 20th —23rd January 2009 at New Delhi.

The programme is ninth in the SPSS series, the earlier programmes being subscribed by leading agencies and projects that include UNDP, UNICEF, CRS, Worldvision, Wateraid, Winrock, Actionaid, PHFI, PSI, CARE, BBC WST, HLF PPT, MPRLP etc.

This training has been designed as a participatory programme that would build-upon the experiential learning of participants. The pedagogy focuses on interactive group learning and aims both at knowledge development and skill upgradation through peer learning.

The fee for training programme is Rs. 12,000/- per participant that includes tuition fee, reading material, lunch at the training venue and other training expenses. For international participants the fees is USD 600. Outstation candidates are encouraged to make their own arrangements for boarding and lodging.

Click here "FLYER" to view more information regarding the programme.

Announcement for International Training Programme. on “Logical Framework Analysis for Designing Development Projects

In the Result-Based Management series, Sambodhi announces the International Training Programme. on “Logical Framework Analysis for Designing Development Projects” to be held at New Delhi from 23-27 February 2009. The aim of the training programme is to augment existing knowledge of the development practitioners on Logical Framework Approach with concurrent enhancement of skills for using the Logical Framework Approach for designing development projects.

Sambodhi’s earlier programmes have been subscribed by leading agencies and projects across the globe. Sambodhi clientele include bilateral and multi-lateral aid agencies, governments, projects, academic institutions and independent consultants including UNDP, UNICEF, UNIFEM, UNESCO, CRS, GTZ, Worldvision, Actionaid, CARE, BBC WST, CRY, IGSSS, FHI, PSI, SNV Bhutan, Winrock, Norweigan Church Aid (NCA), Afghanistan , Royal Education Council Bhutan, Ministry of Education. Govt. of Botswana, Ministry of Plan Implementation Srilanka, State Govt. of Madhya Pradesh, Orrisa, Chattisgarh, Jharkhand, Uttarakhand, Maharastra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, IAMR, IWMI, NCAER, IDRC, ICMR etc.

Click here "FLYER" to view more information regarding the programme.

SWOT = Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats

It is a framework for analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats... usually in case of a product, company, or person.

Business SWOT Analysis
P
What makes SWOT particularly powerful is that, with a little thought, it can help you uncover opportunities that you are well placed to exploit. And by understanding the weaknesses of your business, you can manage and eliminate threats that would otherwise catch you unawares.

More than this, by looking at yourself and your competitors using the SWOT framework, you can start to craft a strategy that helps you distinguish yourself from your competitors, so that you can compete successfully in your market.

To carry out a SWOT Analysis, answer the following questions:

Strengths:

· What advantages does your company have?
· What do you do better than anyone else?
· What unique or lowest-cost resources do you have access to?
· What do people in your market see as your strengths?
· What factors mean that you "get the sale"?

Consider this from an internal perspective, and from the point of view of your customers and people in your market. Be realistic: It's far too easy to fall prey to "not invented here syndrome". (If you are having any difficulty with this, try writing down a list of your characteristics. Some of these will hopefully be strengths!)

In looking at your strengths, think about them in relation to your competitors - for example, if all your competitors provide high quality products, then a high quality production process is not a strength in the market, it is a necessity.

Weaknesses:

· What could you improve?
· What should you avoid?
· What are people in your market likely to see as weaknesses?
· What factors lose you sales?

Again, consider this from an internal and external basis: Do other people seem to perceive weaknesses that you do not see? Are your competitors doing any better than you? It is best to be realistic now, and face any unpleasant truths as soon as possible.

Opportunities:

· Where are the good opportunities facing you?
· What are the interesting trends you are aware of?

Useful opportunities can come from such things as:

· Changes in technology and markets on both a broad and narrow scale
· Changes in government policy related to your field
· Changes in social patterns, population profiles, lifestyle changes, etc.
· Local events

A useful approach for looking at opportunities is to look at your strengths and ask yourself whether these open up any opportunities.
Alternatively, look at your weaknesses and ask yourself whether you could create opportunities by eliminating them.

Threats:

· What obstacles do you face?
· What is your competition doing that you should be worried about?
· Are the required specifications for your job, products or services changing?
· Is changing technology threatening your position?
· Do you have bad debt or cash-flow problems?
· Could any of your weaknesses seriously threaten your business?
Carrying out this analysis will often be illuminating - both in terms of pointing out what needs to be done, and in putting problems into perspective.
Strengths and weaknesses are often internal to your organization. Opportunities and threats often relate to external factors. For this reason the SWOT Analysis is sometimes called Internal-External Analysis and the SWOT Matrix is sometimes called an IE Matrix Analysis Tool.
You can also apply SWOT Analysis to your competitors. As you do this, you'll start to see how and where you should compete against them.


Personal SWOT Analysis

Strengths:

* What advantages (for example, skills, education or connections) do you have that others don't have?
* What do you do better than anyone else?
* What personal resources do you have access to?
* What do other people (and your boss in particular) see as your strengths?

Consider this from your own perspective, and from the point of view of the people around you. And don't be modest, be as objective as you can. If you are having any difficulty with this, try writing down a list of your characteristics. Some of these will hopefully be strengths!

In looking at your strengths, think about them in relation to the people around you - for example, if you're a great mathematician and the people around you are great at math, then this is not likely to be a strength in your current role, it is likely to be a necessity.

Weaknesses:

* What could you improve?
* What should you avoid?
* What things are the people around you likely to see as weaknesses?

Again, consider this from a personal and external basis: Do other people perceive weaknesses that you do not see? Do co-workers consistently out-perform you in key areas? It is best to be realistic now, and face any unpleasant truths as soon as possible.

Opportunities:

* Where are the good opportunities facing you?
* What are the interesting trends you are aware of?

Useful opportunities can come from such things as:

* Changes in technology, markets and your company on both a broad and narrow scale;
* Changes in government policy related to your field;
* Changes in social patterns, population profiles, lifestyle changes, etc.; or
* Local Events

A useful approach to looking at opportunities is also to look at your strengths and ask yourself whether these open up any opportunities.
Alternatively, look at your weaknesses and ask yourself whether you could open up opportunities by eliminating them.

Threats:

* What obstacles do you face?
* What are the people around you doing?
* Is your job (or the demand for the things you do) changing?
* Is changing technology threatening your position?
* Could any of your weaknesses seriously threaten you?

Carrying out this analysis will often be illuminating - both in terms of pointing out what needs to be done, and in putting problems into perspective.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs:Self-Actualization

Self-actualization is the summit of Maslow's motivation theory. It is about the quest of reaching one's full potential as a person. Unlike lower level needs, this need is never fully satisfied; as one grows psychologically there are always new opportunities to continue to grow.

Self-actualized people tend to have motivators such as:

* Truth
* Justice
* Wisdom
* Meaning

Self-actualized persons have frequent occurrences of peak experiences, which are energized moments of profound happiness and harmony. According to Maslow, only a small percentage of the population reaches the level of self-actualization.
Esteem Needs

After a person feels that they "belong", the urge to attain a degree of importance emerges. Esteem needs can be categorized as external motivators and internal motivators.

Internally motivating esteem needs are those such as self-esteem, accomplishment, and self respect. External esteem needs are those such as reputation and recognition.
Some examples of esteem needs are:

* Recognition (external motivator)
* Attention (external motivator)
* Social Status (external motivator)
* Accomplishment (internal motivator)
* Self-respect (internal motivator)

Maslow later improved his model to add a layer in between self-actualization and esteem needs: the need for aesthetics and knowledge.
Social Needs

Once a person has met the lower level physiological and safety needs, higher level motivators awaken. The first level of higher level needs are social needs. Social needs are those related to interaction with others and may include:

* Friendship
* Belonging to a group
* Giving and receiving love

Safety Needs

Once physiological needs are met, one's attention turns to safety and security in order to be free from the threat of physical and emotional harm. Such needs might be fulfilled by:

* Living in a safe area
* Medical insurance
* Job security
* Financial reserves

According to the Maslow hierarchy, if a person feels threatened, needs further up the pyramid will not receive attention until that need has been resolved.
Physiological Needs

Physiological needs are those required to sustain life, such as:

* Air
* Water
* Food
* Sleep

According to this theory, if these fundamental needs are not satisfied then one will surely be motivated to satisfy them. Higher needs such as social needs and esteem are not recognized until one satisfies the needs basic to existence.

Applying Maslow's Needs Hierarchy - Business Management Implications

If Maslow's theory is true, there are some very important leadership implications to enhance workplace motivation. There are staff motivation opportunities by motivating each employee through their style of management, compensation plans, role definition, and company activities.

* Physiological Motivation: Provide ample breaks for lunch and recuperation and pay salaries that allow workers to buy life's essentials.
* Safety Needs: Provide a working environment which is safe, relative job security, and freedom from threats.
* Social Needs: Generate a feeling of acceptance, belonging, and community by reinforcing team dynamics.
* Esteem Motivators: Recognize achievements, assign important projects, and provide status to make employees feel valued and appreciated.
* Self-Actualization: Offer challenging and meaningful work assignments which enable innovation, creativity, and progress according to long-term goals.

Remember, everyone is not motivated by same needs. At various points in their lives and careers, various employees will be motivated by completely different needs. It is imperative that you recognize each employee's needs currently being pursued. In order to motivate their employees, leadership must be understand the current level of needs at which the employee finds themselves, and leverage needs for workplace motivation.

Maslow's Theory - Limitations and Criticism

Though Maslow's hierarchy makes sense intuitively, little evidence supports its strict hierarchy. Actually, recent research challenges the order that the needs are imposed by Maslow's pyramid. As an example, in some cultures, social needs are placed more fundamentally than any others. Further, Maslow's hierarchy fails to explain the "starving artist" scenario, in which the aesthetic neglects their physical needs to pursuit of aesthetic or spiritual goals. Additionally, little evidence suggests that people satisfy exclusively one motivating need at a time, other than situations where needs conflict.

Biodata, Resume and CV

Biodata, Resume and CV

Social Issues Headline Animator

Popular Posts

My Headlines

Disclaimer:

This blog is designed to provide and encourage access within the social work community to sources of current and comprehensive information. Therefore, Indiansocialworker.blogspot.com itself places no restrictions on the use or distribution of the data contained therein.

Some Indiansocialworker.blogspot.com web pages may provide links to other Internet sites for the convenience of users. Indiansocialworker.blogspot.com is not responsible for the availability or content of these external sites, nor does Indiansocialworker.blogspot.com endorse, warrant, or guarantee the products, services, or information described or offered at these other Internet sites. Users cannot assume that the external sites will abide by the same Privacy Policy to which Indiansocialworker.blogspot.com adheres. It is the responsibility of the user to examine the copyright and licensing restrictions of linked pages and to secure all necessary permissions.

- Indian Social Worker Team